Research Reports

Filter the reports below:

  • Allergic asthma

    Clinical trial, with positive findings, conducted on 24 patients attending an asthma outpatient clinic in Scotland; most of them were sensitive to house-dust mite. Approximately half of the patients were randomly allocated to receive homeopathic immunotherapy to their principal allergen; the others received a dummy medicine (placebo). They did not know which treatment group they were in. After 4 weeks, the patients who received homeopathic immunotherapy reported milder asthma symptoms overall than those who received placebo.

    PubMed Link

  • Allergic skin reaction

    Clinical trial, with positive findings, conducted at a university health clinic in South Africa on 30 adult subjects with an allergy to cats. Half of the subjects were randomly allocated to receive a homeopathic combination of cat saliva and histamine; the other half received a dummy medicine (placebo). They did not know which treatment group they were in. After 4 weeks, the subjects who received the homeopathic medicine had a lesser degree of inflammation (wheal) after a skin-prick test than those who received placebo.

    PubMed Link

  • Brain Injury

    Clinical trial, with positive findings, on 50 patients with mild traumatic brain injury and treated at a university medical school in the USA. Approximately half of the patients were randomly allocated to receive homeopathic medicine and the others received dummy medicine (placebo); they were not told which treatment group they were in. After 4 months of treatment, the patients receiving homeopathy showed more improvement on certain functional brain tests than the patients receiving placebo.

    PubMed Link

  • Bronchitis

    Clinical trial, with positive findings, on 217 patients with bronchitis who were treated at doctors’ practices in Germany. Approximately half of the patients were randomly allocated to receive a combination homeopathic medicine called Bronchiselect, and the others received a dummy pill (placebo); they were not told which treatment group they were in. After 3 weeks of treatment, the patients receiving homeopathy had fewer days of coughing than the patients receiving placebo.

    Diefenbach M, Schilken J, Steiner G, Becker HJ (1997). Homöopathische Therapie bei Erkrankungen der Atemwege. Auswertung einer klinischen Studie bei 258 Patienten [Homeopathic therapy in respiratory tract diseases. Evaluation of a clinical study in 258 patients]. Zeitschrift für Allgemeinmedizin; 73:308–314.

  • Childhood diarrhoea

    Systematic review of three clinical trials, with positive conclusions.  The original clinical trials are: (A) Jacobs J, Jiminez LM, Gloyds SS, et al (1993). Homoeopathic treatment of acute childhood diarrhoea. A randomized clinical trial in Nicaragua. British Homoeopathic Journal; 82:83–86; (B) Jacobs J, Jimenez LM, Gloyds SS, et al (1994). Treatment of acute childhood diarrhea with homeopathic medicine; a randomized clinical trial in Nicaragua. Pediatrics; 93:719–725; (C) Jacobs J, Jimenez LM, Malthouse S, et al (2000). Homeopathic treatment of acute childhood diarrhoea: results from a clinical trial in Nepal. Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine; 6:131–139.

    PubMed Link

  • Childhood diarrhoea

    Clinical trial in the Central American republic of Nicaragua, with non-conclusive findings, on 33 children with a history of acute diarrhoea. Approximately half of the patients were randomly allocated to receive homeopathic medicine and the others received dummy medicine (placebo); they were not told which treatment group they were in. The duration of diarrhoea after treatment in the homeopathy group was ½ day less than in the placebo group, but this difference was not significant.

    Jacobs J, Jiminez LM, Gloyds SS, Casares FE, Gaitan MP, Crothers D (1993). Homoeopathic treatment of acute childhood diarrhoea. A randomized clinical trial in Nicaragua. British Homoeopathic Journal; 82:83–86.

  • Childhood diarrhoea

    Clinical trial in the Central American republic of Nicaragua, with positive findings, on 81 children with a history of acute diarrhoea. Approximately half of the patients were randomly allocated to receive homeopathic medicine and the others received dummy medicine (placebo); they were not told which treatment group they were in. The duration of diarrhoea after treatment in the homeopathy group was 1½ days less than in the placebo group.

    PubMed Link

  • Childhood diarrhoea

    Clinical trial in Nepal, with positive findings, on 116 children with a history of acute diarrhoea. Approximately half of the patients were randomly allocated to receive homeopathic medicine and the others received dummy medicine (placebo); they were not told which treatment group they were in. Over the 5-day treatment period, patients in the homeopathy group had fewer stools per day than those in the placebo group.

    PubMed Link

  • Childhood diarrhoea

    Clinical trial in the Central American republic of Honduras, with non-conclusive findings, on 292 children in with a history of acute diarrhoea. Approximately half of the patients were randomly allocated to receive a combination of 5 homeopathic medicines and the others received a dummy pill (placebo); they were not told which treatment group they were in. The duration of diarrhoea after treatment in the homeopathy group was not different from that in the placebo group.

    PubMed Link

  • Chronic fatigue

    Clinical trial, with positive findings, on 86 adults with chronic fatigue and treated in two outpatient departments in the UK. Approximately half of the patients were randomly allocated to receive homeopathic medicine and the others received dummy medicine (placebo); they were not told which treatment group they were in. After a 7-month treatment period, patients in the homeopathy group had more improvement in general fatigue and functional limitations than those in the placebo group. Other measurements did not reveal differences between the groups.

    PubMed Link

  • Common cold

    Clinical trial, with positive findings, on 115 German army soldiers suffering from common cold. Approximately half of the soldiers were randomly allocated to receive a homeopathic medicine called Gripp-Heel and the others received Aspirin; they were not told which treatment group they were in. On the 4th and 10th days of treatment, there was no difference in symptom improvement between the two treatment groups, showing that Gripp-Heel and Aspirin were similarly effective.

    PubMed Link

  • Depression

    Clinical trial, with positive findings, on 55 patients with depression who were treated in an outpatient clinic in Brazil. Approximately half of the patients were randomly allocated to receive homeopathic medicine and the others received Prozac; they were not told which treatment group they were in. After 8 weeks of treatment, there was no difference in symptoms between the two treatment groups, showing that homeopathy and Prozac were similarly effective in the treatment of depression. A higher percentage of patients treated with Prozac reported troublesome side effects.

    PubMed Link

  • Fibromyalgia

    Systematic review of four clinical trials, with cautiously positive conclusions.  Includes RCTs reported in the following papers: (A) Bell I, Lewis D, Brooks A, et al (2004). Improved clinical status in fibromyalgia patients treated with individualized homeopathic remedies versus placebo. Rheumatology; 43:577–582; (B) Fisher P, Greenwood A, Huskisson EC, et al (1989). Effect of homoeopathic treatment on fibrositis (primary fibromyalgia). British Medical Journal; 299: 365-366; (C) Relton C, Smith C, Raw J, et al et al (2009). Healthcare provided by a homeopath as an adjunct to usual care for fibromyalgia (FMS): results of a pilot randomised controlled trial. Homeopathy; 98:77–82.

    PubMed Link

  • Fibromyalgia

    Clinical trial, with positive findings, on 53 fibromyalgia patients at a private clinic in the USA. Approximately half of the patients were randomly allocated to receive homeopathic medicine and the others received dummy medicine (placebo); they were not told which treatment group they were in. After 3 months of treatment, the patients in the homeopathy group had more improvement in touch-sensitive pain and quality of life than those in the placebo group.

    PubMed Link

  • Fibromyalgia

    Clinical trial, with positive findings, on 30 fibromyalgia patients at a rheumatology outpatient clinic in the UK. Approximately half of the patients were randomly allocated to receive the homeopathic medicine Rhus toxicodendron (Rhus tox) and the others received a dummy pill (placebo); they were not told which treatment group they were in. After a period of one month’s treatment, the patients in the Rhus tox group had fewer touch-sensitive areas of pain than those in the placebo group.

    PubMed Link

  • Fibromyalgia

    Clinical trial, with positive findings, on 36 fibromyalgia patients at a rheumatology outpatient clinic in the UK. Approximately half of the patients were randomly allocated to receive homeopathic medicine plus usual care, and the others received usual care only. After 22 weeks of treatment, the patients in the homeopathy group had less severe fibromyalgia symptoms than those in the group receiving usual care only.

    PubMed Link

  • Hay Fever (Seasonal allergic rhinitis)

    Systematic review of seven clinical trials, with cautiously positive conclusions.  Includes RCTs reported in the following papers: (A) Wiesenauer M, Gaus W (1985). Double-blind trial comparing the effectiveness of the homoeopathic preparation Galphimia potentization D6, Galphimia dilution 10?6 and placebo on pollinosis. Arzneimittel Forschung; 35:1745–1747; (B) Wiesenauer M, Gaus W, Häussler S (1990). Behandlung der Pollinoisis mit Galphimia glauca. Eine Doppelblindstudie unter Praxisbedingungen [Treatment of pollinosis with the homeopathic preparation Galphimia glauca. A double-blind trial in clinical practice]. Allergologie; 13:359–363; (C) Wiesenauer M, Lüdtke R (1995). The treatment of pollinosis with Galphimia glauca D4 – a randomized placebo-controlled double-blind clinical trial. Phytomedicine; 2: 3-6.

    Wiesenauer M, Lüdtke R (1996). A meta-analysis of the homeopathic treatment of pollinosis with Galphimia glauca. Forschende Komplementärmedizin und Klassische Naturheilkunde; 3: 230–236.

  • Hay Fever (Seasonal allergic rhinitis)

    Clinical trial, with positive findings, on 66 patients treated at a specialist outpatient department in Norway for hay fever due to birch pollen allergy. Approximately half of the patients were randomly allocated to receive a homeopathic preparation of birch pollen, and the others received a dummy pill (placebo); they were not told which treatment group they were in. On several days over a period of 1 month during the birch pollen season, the group that received the homeopathic preparation had less serious and fewer hay fever symptoms than the group that received placebo.

    PubMed Link

  • Hay Fever (Seasonal allergic rhinitis)

    Clinical trial, with negative findings, on 73 patients treated at a specialist outpatient department in Norway for hay fever due to birch pollen allergy. Approximately half of the patients were randomly allocated to receive a homeopathic preparation of birch pollen, and the others received a dummy pill (placebo); they were not told which treatment group they were in. On several days over a period of 10 days during the birch pollen season, the group that received placebo had less serious and fewer hay fever symptoms than the group that received the homeopathic preparation.

    PubMed Link

  • Hay Fever (Seasonal allergic rhinitis)

    Clinical trial, with non-conclusive findings, on 51 patients treated at a specialist outpatient department in Norway for hay fever due to birch pollen allergy. Approximately half of the patients were randomly allocated to receive a homeopathic preparation of birch pollen, and the others received a dummy pill (placebo); they were not told which treatment group they were in. Over a period of 10 days during the birch pollen season, the group that received the homeopathic preparation reported hay fever symptoms of similar severity and frequency as those of the group that received placebo.

    PubMed Link

  • Hay Fever (Seasonal allergic rhinitis)

    Clinical trial, with positive findings, on 34 hay fever sufferers, identified through advertisement by a College of Naturopathic Medicine & Health Sciences in the USA. Approximately half of the patients were randomly allocated to receive a homeopathic preparation derived from grasses and weeds, and the others received a dummy pill (placebo); they were not told which treatment group they were in. After a period of 4 weeks during the hay fever season locally, the group that received the homeopathic preparation had improvement in hay fever symptoms compared to the group that received placebo.

    PubMed Link

  • Hay Fever (Seasonal allergic rhinitis)

    Clinical trial, with positive findings, at two specialist homeopathic clinics and in twenty-six NHS general practices in the UK, on 144 patients treated for hay fever due to grass pollen allergy. Approximately half of the patients were randomly allocated to receive a homeopathic preparation of grass pollens, and the others received a dummy pill (placebo); they were not told which treatment group they were in. After a period of 4 weeks during the grass pollen season, the group that received the homeopathic preparation reported less severe hay fever symptoms than those in the group that received placebo.

    PubMed Link

  • Hay Fever (Seasonal allergic rhinitis)

    Clinical trial, with positive findings, on 135 patients treated for hay fever at a specialist homeopathic clinic in Germany. Approximately half of the patients were randomly allocated to treatment with a homeopathic nose spray and the others to a conventional anti-allergy nose spray; the patients were not told which treatment group they were in. After 6 weeks, the homeopathic spray was found to be as effective as the conventional spray in achieving improvement in hay fever symptoms.

    PubMed Link

  • Hay Fever (Seasonal allergic rhinitis)

    Clinical trial, with non-conclusive findings, on 72 patients treated for hay fever at doctors’ practices in Germany. Approximately half of the patients were randomly allocated to receive a homeopathic medicine called Galphimia, and the others received a dummy pill (placebo); they were not told which treatment group they were in. After a period of 4 weeks during the pollen season, the group that received the homeopathic medicine tended to have fewer hay fever symptoms than the group that received placebo, but the difference was not significant.

    PubMed Link

  • Hay Fever (Seasonal allergic rhinitis)

    Clinical trial, with positive findings, on 201 patients treated for hay fever at doctors’ practices in Germany. Approximately half of the patients were randomly allocated to receive the homeopathic medicine Galphimia, and the others received a dummy pill (placebo); they were not told which treatment group they were in. After a period of about 5 weeks during the pollen season, the group that received the homeopathic medicine reported fewer hay fever symptoms than the group that received placebo.

    Wiesenauer M, Gaus W, Häussler S (1990). Behandlung der Pollinoisis mit Galphimia glauca. Eine Doppelblindstudie unter Praxisbedingungen [Treatment of pollinosis with the homeopathic preparation Galphimia glauca. A double-blind trial in clinical practice]. Allergologie; 13:359–363.

  • Hay Fever (Seasonal allergic rhinitis)

    Clinical trial, with non-conclusive findings, on 116 patients treated for hay fever at doctors’ practices in Germany. Approximately half of the patients were randomly allocated to receive the homeopathic medicine Galphimia, and the others received a dummy pill (placebo); they were not told which treatment group they were in. After 4 weeks, the patients who received the homeopathic medicine reported fewer eye-related hay fever symptoms than the patients who received placebo. Nose-related symptoms were not improved.

    Wiesenauer M, Lüdtke R (1995). The treatment of pollinosis with Galphimia glauca D4 – a randomized placebo-controlled double-blind clinical trial. Phytomedicine; 2: 3-6.

  • Ileus (Post-operative)

    Systematic review of six clinical trials, none of whose positive findings were reported in peer-reviewed journals. Cautiously positive conclusions.

    PubMed Link

  • Immune function

    Clinical trial, with positive findings, on 36 patients at a homeopathy clinic in Australia. Approximately half of the patients were randomly allocated to receive homeopathic medicine and the others received dummy medicine (placebo); they were not told which treatment group they were in. After a period of one week’s treatment, the patients in the homeopathy group reported improved feeling of wellbeing compared to those in the placebo group.

    Kuzeff RM (1998). Homeopathy, sensation of well-being and CD4-levels – A placebo-controlled, randomized trial. Complementary Therapies in Medicine; 6:4–9.

  • Influenza

    Clinical trial, with positive findings, on 462 patients treated for influenza (‘flu) symptoms at general medical practices in France. Approximately half of the patients were randomly allocated to receive a homeopathic medicine called Oscillococcinum, and the others received a dummy pill (placebo); they were not told which treatment group they were in. After 48 hours, recovery from ‘flu symptoms was reported by 7% more patients who received Oscillococcinum than those who received placebo.

    PubMed Link

  • Influenza

    Clinical trial, with positive findings, on 334 patients treated for influenza (‘flu) symptoms at general or specialist medical practices in Germany. Approximately half of the patients were randomly allocated to receive a homeopathic medicine called Oscillococcinum, and the others received a dummy pill (placebo); they were not told which treatment group they were in. After 48 hours, recovery from ‘flu symptoms was reported by 9% more patients who received Oscillococcinum than those who received placebo.

    Papp R, Schuback G, Beck E, et al (1998). Oscillococcinum® in patients with influenza-like syndromes: a placebo-controlled double-blind evaluation. British Homoeopathic Journal; 87:69–76.

  • Insomnia

    Clinical trial, with positive reported findings, conducted at a university health clinic in South Africa on 30 adult subjects with insomnia. Approximately half of the subjects were randomly allocated to receive the homeopathic medicine Coffea cruda; the others received a dummy medicine (placebo). They did not know which treatment group they were in. After a period of 8 weeks, the subjects who received the homeopathic medicine had a somewhat longer duration of sleep per night than those who received placebo.

    Kolia-Adam N, Solomon E, Bond J, Deroukakis M (2008). The efficacy of Coffea cruda on insomnia: a double blind trial. Simillimum; 21: 91-99.

  • Insomnia

    Systematic review of four clinical trials, with cautiously negative conclusions.  Includes the trial reported in Carlini EA, Braz S, Troncone LRP, et al (1987). Efeito hipnótico de medicação homeopática e do placebo. Avaliação pela técnica de “duplo-cego” e “cruzamento” [Hypnotic effect of homeopathic medication and placebo. Evaluation by “double-blind” and “crossover” techniques]. Revista da Associação Médica Brasileira; 33:83–88.

    PubMed Link

  • Insomnia

    Clinical trial, with non-conclusive findings, on 26 insomnia patients at homeopathic clinics in Brazil. Approximately half of the patients were randomly allocated to receive homeopathic medicine and the others received dummy medicine (placebo); they were not told which treatment group they were in. After a period of 6 weeks’ treatment, a marked sleep improvement was reported by patients of each group (homeopathic medicine and placebo medicine), but with no difference between the groups.

    PubMed Link

  • Insomnia

    Clinical trial, with positive findings, on 30 insomnia sufferers in South Africa, who were identified through local advertising. Approximately half of the patients were randomly allocated to receive homeopathic medicine and the others received dummy medicine (placebo); they were not told which treatment group they were in. After 4 weeks, participants who received homeopathy reported more improvement in sleep compared to those who received placebo.

    PubMed Link

  • Low back pain

    Clinical trial, with positive findings, on 37 sufferers of chronic low back pain at an orthopaedic university hospital in Switzerland. Approximately half of the patients were randomly allocated to receive homeopathic medicine and the others received physiotherapy; they were not told which treatment group they were in. After 8 appointments, over a period of 8 weeks, participants in the homeopathy group had better improvement in disability due to back pain than those in the physiotherapy group.

    PubMed Link

  • Low back pain

    Clinical trial, with positive findings, on 155 sufferers of acute low back pain at 19 GP practices in the UK. Approximately half of the patients were randomly allocated for treatment with a homeopathic gel and the others with Ralgex cream; they were not told which treatment group they were in. After 1 week, participants in both groups reported a similar degree of pain reduction, showing that the homeopathic and conventional gels had equivalent effectiveness in the treatment of low back pain. A higher percentage of patients treated with Ralgex reported troublesome side effects.

    PubMed Link

  • Menopausal syndrome

    Clinical trial, with positive findings, conducted at 35 gynaecology centres in France, on 101 women who complained of menopausal hot flushes. Approximately half of the subjects were randomly allocated to receive a homeopathic medicine containing Actaea racemosa, Arnica, Glonoinum, Lachesis and Sanguinaria; the other group of women received a dummy medicine (placebo). They did not know which treatment group they were in. After 12 weeks, the women who received the homeopathic medicine had fewer and/or less intense hot flushes than those who received placebo.

    PubMed Link

  • Muscle soreness

    Clinical trial conducted on 46 runners competing in the 1995 marathon race in Oslo, Norway, with positive findings. Approximately half of the runners were randomly allocated to receive homeopathic Arnica; the others received a dummy medicine (placebo). They did not know which treatment group they were in. Over a period of 3 days following the race, the runners who received the homeopathic medicine reported less muscle soreness than those who received placebo.

    Tveiten D, Bruseth S, Borchgrevink CF, Norseth J (1998). Effects of the homoeopathic remedy Arnica D30 on marathon runners: a randomized, double-blind study during the 1995 Oslo Marathon. Complementary Therapies in Medicine, 6:71–74.

  • Oedema (Post-operative)

    Clinical trial, with positive findings, on 48 patients with bruising and swelling following plastic surgery on the nose, treated at a university hospital in the USA. Approximately one third of the patients were randomly allocated to receive homeopathic Arnica, another third received steroids, and the others received no treatment. They were not told which treatment group they were in. After 8 days, there were no differences in swelling between the three groups; the extent and intensity of bruising was least in the Arnica group and most in the steroid group.

    PubMed Link

  • Otitis Media

    Clinical trial, with positive findings, on 94 children treated for acute middle ear infection at a paediatric clinic in the USA. Approximately half of the children were randomly allocated to receive homeopathic ear drops; the others received standard therapy. During a period of 5 days of treatment, symptom scores tended to be lower in the group of children receiving ear drops than in those receiving standard therapy. The rate of symptom improvement was faster in children in the ear-drop group.

    PubMed Link

  • Otitis media

    Clinical trial at a children’s clinic in the USA, with positive findings, on 72 patients with acute middle ear infection. Approximately half of the patients were randomly allocated to receive homeopathy; the others received dummy medicine (placebo). They did not know which treatment group they were in. In the first 3 days after treatment began, there was better symptom improvement in patients who received homeopathy than in those who received placebo. During a period of 6 weeks after treatment, there were 20% fewer treatment failures in patients who received homeopathy, though the difference was not statistically significant.

    PubMed Link

  • Perennial allergic rhinitis

    Clinical trial, with positive findings, on 50 patients treated at a specialist outpatient department in the UK for allergy to house dust mites, animals, pollens or foods. Approximately half of the patients were randomly allocated to receive a homeopathic preparation of the causal antigen and the others received a dummy pill (placebo); they were not told which treatment group they were in. After 4 weeks, both treatments resulted in improvement in allergy symptoms; the homeopathy group had improvement in nasal airflow compared with the placebo group.

    PubMed Link

  • Plantar fasciitis

    Clinical trial, with positive findings, on 14 patients treated at a podiatry clinic in the UK for heel pain due to tissue inflammation. Approximately half of the patients were randomly allocated to receive the homeopathic medicine Ruta graveolens and the others received a dummy pill (placebo); they were not told which treatment group they were in. By the fourth day and up to 2 weeks, patients in the homeopathy group had a greater reduction in pain than those in the placebo group.

    Clark J, Percivall A (2000). A preliminary investigation into the effectiveness of the homeopathic remedy, Ruta graveolens, in the treatment of pain in plantar fasciitis. British Journal of Podiatry; 3:81–85.

  • Post-operative bruising

    Clinical trial, with positive findings, on 26 patients undergoing facelift surgery at a tertiary care centre in the USA. Approximately half of the patients were randomly allocated to received homeopathic Arnica; the others received a dummy medicine (placebo). They did not know which treatment group they were in. Over a period of 10 days, the area of bruising in patients who received the homeopathic medicine was between 9% and 29% less than that in the placebo group.

    PubMed Link

  • Post-operative pain

    Clinical trial, with positive findings, on 111 adult patients undergoing tonsillectomy surgery at a general hospital in the United Kingdom. Approximately half of the patients were randomly allocated to receive homeopathic Arnica; the others received a dummy medicine (placebo). They did not know which treatment group they were in. Over a period of 14 days, the patients who received the homeopathic medicine had 5% less pain associated with tonsillectomy than those who received placebo.

    PubMed Link

  • Post-operative wound healing

    Clinical trial, with negative and positive findings, on 88 patients with toe bunions and attending an orthopaedic hospital in Germany. Approximately half of the patients were randomly allocated to receive homeopathic Arnica and the others received a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID); they were not told which treatment group they were in. After 4 days, Arnica was inferior to the NSAID as regards pain management, but Arnica and the NSAID were similarly effective for wound irritation and for patient mobility. Arnica was tolerated by patients better than the NSAID.

    PubMed Link

  • Postpartum bleeding

    Clinical trial, with positive findings, on 40 women following childbirth at a medical centre in Israel. Approximately half of the women were randomly allocated to receive the homeopathic medicines Arnica and Bellis perennis, and the others received a dummy pill (placebo); they were not told which treatment group they were in. After 3 days, the women who received homeopathy had evidence of having lost less blood than those who received placebo.

    PubMed Link

  • Postpartum lactation

    Clinical trial, with positive findings, on 71 women at a childbirth unit in France. Approximately half of the women were randomly allocated to receive homeopathic Bryonia and Apis mellifica, and the others received a dummy pill (placebo); they were not told which treatment group they were in. After 4 days, the women who received homeopathy had improvements in breast pain and milk production compared to women who received placebo.

    PubMed Link

  • Premenstrual syndrome

    Clinical trial, with positive findings, on 19 women with premenstrual syndrome and attending a gynaecology outpatient clinic in Israel. Approximately half of the women were randomly allocated to receive homeopathic medicine, and the others received dummy medicine (placebo); they were not told which treatment group they were in. After 3 months, relief of symptoms was reported by 90% of the women who received homeopathy compared to 37% of women who received placebo.

    PubMed Link

  • Psoriasis

    Clinical trial, with positive findings, on 171 patients with psoriasis who were attending a Dermatology Centre in the USA. Approximately half of the patients were randomly allocated to receive a homeopathic ointment called Mahonia (trade name, Reliéva), and the others received dummy ointment (placebo); they were not told which treatment group they were in. After 12 weeks of treatment, patients receiving Reliéva ointment had less severe psoriasis symptoms and better quality of life than those who received placebo ointment.

    PubMed Link

  • Psoriasis

    Clinical trial, with positive findings, on 80 patients with psoriasis who were attending doctors’ or dermatology clinics in Germany. The patients applied a homeopathic ointment called Mahonia to one side of their body, and dummy ointment (placebo) to the other side; they were not told which ointment was which. After an average treatment period of 4 weeks, patients reported greater improvement in symptoms on the Mahonia-treated side than on the placebo-treated side. The doctors, however, did not find a difference in outcome between the two ointments.

    Wiesenauer M, Lüdtke R (1996). Mahonia aquifolium in patients with Psoriasis vulgaris – an intraindividual study. Phytomedicine; 3: 231-235.

  • Radiodermatitis

    Clinical trial, with positive findings, on 61 patients treated at a rehabilitation and palliative care department in Italy for dermatitis caused by having had radiotherapy for breast cancer. Approximately half of the patients were randomly allocated to receive homeopathic Belladonna and X-ray, and the others received a dummy pill (placebo); they were not told which treatment group they were in. During the period of radiotherapy, there was no difference between the groups. After 30 days’ recovery from radiotherapy, the patients in the homeopathy group reported less severe symptoms than those in the placebo group.

    PubMed Link

  • Renal failure

    Clinical trial, with positive findings, on 35 patients with kidney failure, who were receiving blood dialysis three times a week at a hospital in Italy. Approximately half of the participants were randomly allocated to receive a homeopathic medicine called China rubra; the others received a dummy pill (placebo). They were not told which treatment group they were in. After a period of 4 weeks, there was an improvement in weakness, lethargy and headache in the patients who received homeopathic treatment compared to those who received placebo.

    Saruggia M, Corghi E (1992). Effects of homoeopathic dilutions of china rubra on intradialytic symptomatology in patients treated with chronic haemodialysis. British Homoeopathic Journal; 81:86-88.

  • Rheumatic diseases

    Systematic review of six clinical trials, whose positive findings have not typically been reported in peer-reviewed journals. Cautiously positive conclusions.

    PubMed Link

  • Seborrhoeic dermatitis; facial eczema with dandruff

    Clinical trial, at a skin clinic in the USA, with positive findings in a total of 29 patients with seborrhoeic dermatitis (facial eczema with dandruff). Approximately half of the patients were randomly allocated to receive homeopathic medicine and the others received dummy medicine (placebo); they were not told which treatment group they were in. After a period of 10 weeks’ treatment, the group that received the homeopathic medicine reported more improvement in skin symptoms than the group that received placebo.

    PubMed Link

  • Sepsis

    Clinical trial, with positive findings, on 67 patients with severe sepsis (blood poisoning) in an Intensive Care Unit at a university hospital in Austria. Approximately half of the patients were randomly allocated to receive homeopathy; the others received dummy medicine (placebo). They did not know which treatment group they were in. During a period of 6 months, there was a 75% survival rate amongst patients who received homeopathic treatment compared to a 50% survival rate amongst those who received placebo.

    PubMed Link

  • Sinusitis

    Clinical trial, with positive findings, on 80 patients treated for sinusitis at medical practices in Ukraine. Approximately half of the patients were randomly allocated to receive a combination homeopathic medicine, and the others received a dummy pill (placebo); they were not told which treatment group they were in. After 3 weeks, the patients who received the homeopathic medicine reported more improvement in sinusitis symptoms than those who received placebo.

    PubMed Link

  • Sinusitis

    Clinical trial, with positive findings, on a total of 131 patients treated for long-term sinusitis by Ear Nose & Throat specialists in Germany. Approximately two thirds of the patients were randomly allocated to receive a homeopathic medicine called Euphorbium (in either of two different formulations), and the others received a dummy pill (placebo). They were not told which of the treatment groups they were in. After 5 months, the patients who received Euphorbium reported more improvement in sinusitis symptoms than those that received placebo.

    Weiser M, Clasen B (1994). Randomisierte plazebokontrolierte Doppelblindstudie zur Untersuchung der klinische Wirksamkeit der homöopathischen Euphorbium compositum-Nasentropfen S bei chronischer Sinusitis [Randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study of the clinical efficacy of the homeopathic Euphorbium compositum-S nasal spray in cases of chronic sinusitis]. Forschende Komplementärmedizin; 1:251–259.

  • Sinusitis

    Clinical trial, with non-conclusive findings, on a total of 152 patients treated for sinusitis by doctors in Germany. Approximately three quarters of the patients were randomly allocated to receive a homeopathic medicine (in one of three different formulations); the other quarter received a dummy pill (placebo). They were not told which of the treatment groups they were in. After 3–4 weeks, there was no difference in the improvement of sinusitis symptoms that was reported from the four groups of patients.

    PubMed Link

  • Sinusitis

    Clinical trial, with positive findings, on 107 patients treated for acute sinusitis by Ear Nose & Throat specialists in Ukraine. Approximately half of the patients were randomly allocated to receive a homeopathic medicine called Sinfrontal, and the others received a dummy pill (placebo); they were not told which treatment group they were in. After 1 week, the patients who received the homeopathic medicine reported less severe sinusitis symptoms than those who received placebo.

    PubMed Link

  • Snoring

    Clinical trial, with positive findings, on 90 individuals treated for snoring by an Ear Nose & Throat specialist in the USA. Approximately half of the participants were randomly allocated to receive a homeopathic medicine called Snore Stop, and the others received a dummy pill (placebo); they were not told which treatment group they were in. After 10 days, the partners of those who received the homeopathic medicine reported a greater reduction in snoring than those whose partners received placebo.

    PubMed Link

  • Sports injury

    Clinical trial, with positive findings, on 19 male sportsmen in Spain. Before a period of sports activity, approximately half of the men were randomly allocated to receive a homeopathic medicine called Rendimax and the others received a dummy pill (placebo). They were not told which treatment group they were in. The men who received Rendimax had better muscular performance than those who received placebo.

    Egocheaga Rodriguez J, Urraca JM, Angeles Montoliu M, et al (2000). Estudio a doble ciego con «Rendi-Max®» en deportistas de élite. Efectos sobre los niveles submáximos y máximos de esfuerzo [Double-cross study with Rendi-Max in elite sportsmen. Submaximal and maximal effort effects]. Archivos de Medicina del Deporte; 17:483-490.

  • Stomatitis

    Clinical trial, with positive findings, on 30 cancer patients with stomatitis (serious mouth inflammation) at a Children’s Medical Centre in Israel. Approximately half of the patients were randomly allocated to receive a homeopathic medicine called Traumeeel; the others received dummy medicine (placebo). They did not know which treatment group they were in. After 2 weeks, the patients who received the homeopathic medicine had less severe stomatitis symptoms than those who received placebo.

    PubMed Link

  • Tonsillitis

    Clinical trial, with positive findings, conducted at a primary school in South Africa, on 30 children with acute viral tonsillitis. Half of the children were randomly allocated to receive a complex homeopathic medicine that contained Belladonna plus six other remedies; the other half received a dummy medicine (placebo). They did not know which treatment group they were in. After 6 days, the children who received the homeopathic medicine had considerably less pain associated with tonsillectomy than those who received placebo.

    PubMed Link

  • Tracheal secretions

    Clinical trial, with positive findings, on 50 patients with accumulation of heavy fluid in the trachea (windpipe) in an Intensive Care Unit at a university hospital in Austria. Approximately half of the patients were randomly allocated to receive a homeopathic medicine called Potassium dichromate; the others received a dummy medicine (placebo). They did not know which treatment group they were in. After 2 days, there was less accumulation of heavy fluid in the windpipe of patients who received homeopathic treatment than in those who received placebo.

    PubMed Link

  • Upper respiratory tract infections, including otitis media

    Systematic review of seventeen clinical trials, with positive conclusions.

    PubMed Link

  • Upper respiratory tract infections, including otitis media

    Systematic review of six clinical trials, with cautiously positive conclusions.

    PubMed Link

  • Uraemic pruritus

    Clinical trial at kidney dialysis centres in Brazil, with positive findings, on 20 patients with moderate to severe itching of the skin. Approximately half of the patients were randomly allocated to receive homeopathy; the others received dummy medicine (placebo). They did not know which treatment group they were in. During a period of 2 months, the itching became less severe in the homeopathy group but not in the placebo group. More patients responded to treatment with homeopathy than to placebo, though the only statistically significant difference was at 1 month.

    PubMed Link

  • Varicose veins

    Clinical trial at a rehabilitation clinic in Austria, with positive findings, on 61 patients with varicose veins in the legs. Approximately half of the patients were randomly allocated to receive a homeopathic medicine called Poikiven; the others received a dummy medicine (placebo). They did not know which treatment group they were in. After 24 days, the legs of patients who received the homeopathic medicine had better leg circulation than those who received placebo.

    Ernst E, Saradeth T, Resch KL (1990). Complementary therapy of varicose veins – a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial. Phlebology; 5:157–163.

  • Vertigo

    Systematic review of two clinical trials, with positive conclusions.  Includes RCTs reported in the following papers: (A) Issing W, Klein P, Weiser M (2005). The homeopathic preparation Vertigoheel versus Ginkgo biloba in the treatment of vertigo in an elderly population: a double-blinded, randomized, controlled clinical trial. Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, 11:155–160; (B) Weiser M, Strösser W, Klein P (1998). Homeopathic vs. conventional treatment of vertigo: a randomized double-blind controlled clinical study. Archives of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, 124:879–885.

    PubMed Link

  • Vertigo

    Clinical trial, with positive findings, on 154 patients with vertigo who were treated at study centres in Germany. Approximately half of the patients were randomly allocated to receive a homeopathic medicine called Vertigoheel and the others received the herbal remedy Ginkgo biloba. Patients were not told which treatment group they were in. After 6 weeks of treatment, there was a similar improvement in vertigo status in the two treatment groups, showing that homeopathy and Ginkgo biloba were similarly effective in the treatment of vertigo in these patients.

    PubMed Link

  • Vertigo

    Clinical trial, with positive findings, on 105 patients with vertigo who were treated at general medical practices in Germany. Approximately half of the patients were randomly allocated to receive a homeopathic medicine called Vertigoheel and the others received a conventional anti-vertigo drug called betahistine. Patients were not told which treatment group they were in. After 6 weeks of treatment, there was a similar improvement in vertigo status in the two treatment groups, showing that homeopathy and betahistine were similarly effective in the treatment of vertigo in these patients.

    PubMed Link